Tuesday, September 06, 2005

Web of Law

Thomas Smith's article on The Web Of Law is fascinating. One highlight below:

Our common law system, and indeed, any common law system, will very likely have an
organic organization that can be mapped, studied, and probably exploited, in a similar way. That common law systems, including ours, spontaneously organize themselves into subject matter or topical clusters, can hardly fail to be of interest to anyone interested in how legal systems grow, change, and function. More practically, exploiting the information embedded in citation networks has great promise for making it easier for lawyers, judges, and scholars to access the cases and other authorities in the growing Web of Law that are the most relevant to their particular projects, just as Google did for users of the World Wide Web.
....
Network analysis would also reveal which cases are important to scholars and which articles important to judges. The cases law professors cite may be quite different from those cited by judges, and the articles cited by judges may be different from those most cited by law professors.


The cartology of law. Just like during the Renaissance, where European scholars became fascinated with mapping the "new world," modern scholars in the Information Age have become to map our "cyber world."

3 Comments:

Blogger Gizmo said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

9/06/2005 10:17:00 AM  
Blogger firefox said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

9/06/2005 10:20:00 AM  
Blogger Joe Powel said...

This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.

9/06/2005 10:24:00 AM  

Post a Comment

<< Home